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Ambulatory Phlebectomy

Phlebectomy involves surgically removing medium to large varicose veins near the skin surface by inserting a surgical instrument with a hook through small incisions made in the skin and pulling the veins out in segments. The phlebectomy procedure may be performed as a standalone procedure or performed in conjunction with saphenous vein treatment.

WHAT IS AMBULATORY PHLEBECTOMY?

Ambulatory phlebectomy is an outpatient procedure that removes superficial veins through very small incisions in the skin. The procedure involves four different steps:

  • outlining or marking the veins to be treated;
  • injecting local anesthesia into the skin;
  • surgical removal of the bulging veins, segment by segment, through small incisions; and
  • wearing compression stockings for one week or more after surgery.

WHEN IS AMBULATORY PHLEBECTOMY APPROPRIATE?

Ambulatory phlebectomy may be used to remove both asymptomatic and symptomatic superficial veins from the skin. Typically, treated veins are the larger, bulging (raised) and varicose veins, although smaller veins may also be removed with ambulatory phlebectomy. This procedure is most commonly done with VNUS closure procedure.

IS AMBULATORY PHLEBECTOMY PAINFUL?

Ambulatory phlebectomy is performed under local anesthesia and patients should not feel any pain during the procedure. After surgery, discomfort should also be minimal to none, especially if compression stockings are worn as directed.

WHAT ARE THE COMPLICATIONS OR POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS OF AMBULATORY PHLEBECTOMY?

Temporary bruising and swelling of the treated area is typical and is minimized with compression stockings. The small incisions heal well without sutures, and after six to 12 months, they are practically imperceptible. (Note: In darker-skinned patients, the incision sites may be darker-colored before fading.)

WHAT CAN I EXPECT AFTER HAVING HAD AMBULATORY PHLEBECTOMY?

Bruising and swelling is normal and temporary. You can walk immediately after surgery and carry on normal daily activities, except for exercise and heavy lifting. You must follow the activity restrictions and wear the compression stockings as directed by your doctor